Art

Regimental Oneton | Categorically Speaking

We live in a society of labels. Consciously or not, many people wind up squashing their lives into digestible categories for the sake of ticking boxes in questionnaires, filling out social media profiles, or not ruffling the feathers of the rest of society. Society loves people who can aptly be described in one sentence. White collar or blue collar, Liberal or Conservative, omnivore or vegetarian, Canadians or Bruins fan. People can process this and move on. They’ve made up their mind about you, and whether or not they’d like to have a beer with you.

STREET ERASER

Playing on the truth that there is always something hiding under the surface, London creatives Guus Ter Beek and Tayfun Sarier reversed the usual purpose of Photoshop by revealing reality, as they merged the digital and real worlds together.

Pablo Aracena | Graphic Difference

Pablo Aracena, a.k.a. Pax Arts, a Canadian of Chilean origin, came to Canada as a youth with his family in the late 1980s. Immersed in hip-hop music and culture as a kid, he would spend hours drawing graffiti sketches and characters. He pursued a degree in Art and Design, and eventually, his passion for graphic design combined with his interest in street wear. This led him to discover the medium of screen-printing and to create his own custom T-shirt line, Artcore Clothing.

Andreas Scheiger | Upcycle Fetish

We all know vintage cycling racing has its own niche market, which has been on the rise recently—think Rouleur magazine and Musette Caffe in Vancouver (yes, we just noticed the distinctly European feel)—and we may have just stumbled across our favourite within this said niche. Austrian artist Andreas Scheiger’s “Upcycle Fetish” project combines vintage racing and a love of upcycling scrap bike parts, with incredible and dynamic pieces of utility art.

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